Center of Excellence for Learning in Education, Science and Technology A National Science Foundation Science of Learning Center

Non-Conference Presentations 2005

  1. Bullock, D. (2005). Modeling cortico-subcortical interactions during planning, learning and voluntary control of actions. CELEST Science of Learning seminar series, Boston University, January.
  2. Bullock, D. (2005). Cooperation of neural circuits for queuing and timing of fluent action. Symposium on “The Control of Interceptive Actions” at the Institute for Fundamental and Clinical Human Movement Sciences, Free University, Amsterdam, March.
  3. Bullock, D. (2005). Constructing a model of how the cerebellum may contribute to adaptive timing and sequence learning. Invited lecture, Neuroscience Institute, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis TN, April.
  4. Carpenter, G.A. (2005). Distributed learning and hierarchical knowledge discovery: A new framework using ART neural networks. CELEST Science of Learning seminar series, Boston University, February.
  5. Eichenbaum, H. (2005). Memory in 3 easy steps: The view from cognitive neuroscience. Invited lecture, Florida State University, March.
  6. Eichenbaum, H. (2005). ). Recollection and the hippocampus: 3 easy steps. Invited lecture, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Department of Neurology, March.
  7. Fazl, A., Grossberg, S. Mingolla, E. (2005). ). Coping with the roving eye: How attention controls object recognition. Harvard Vision Lab seminar series, December.
  8. Grossberg, S. (2005). featured in the June Science Coalition. http://sciencecoalition.org/researcherspotlight/boston/grossberg_061305.htm.
  9. Grossberg, S. (2005). Neural models of autonomous learning, categorization, prediction, and search. Opening keynote plenary lecture at the annual international conference on Knowledge Intensive Multi-Agent Systems (KIMAS), Cambridge MA, April.
  10. Grossberg, S. and Watanabe, T. (2005). Cortical dynamics of perceptual learning with and without attention. CELEST Science of Learning seminar series, Boston University, March.
  11. Guenther, F.H. (2005). Cortical interactions underlying the production of speech sounds. Invited lecture, American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA) Research Institute, San Diego CA, November.
  12. Guenther, F.H. (2005). ). Using modeling and neural imaging to investigate normal and disordered speech. Invited lecture, American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA) Convention, San Diego CA, November.
  13. Hasselmo, M.E. (2005). ). Hippocampal theta rhythm and memory guided behavior. University of Texas, San Antonio TX,, February.
  14. Hasselmo, M.E. (2005). A spiking model of hippocampus for guiding behavior. NSF workshop on “Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience”, April.
  15. Hasselmo, M.E. (2005). Presentation to children on visual illusions and hands-on models of brain anatomy in Nicholas Hasselmo’s second-grade classroom. April.
  16. Hasselmo, M.E. (2005). Mechanisms of memory guided behavior in the prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. National Institutes of Health (NIH), October.
  17. Jacobs, J. (2005). EEG oscillations and neural firing in humans during spatial navigation. Lecture at the Cognitive Neuroscience graduate symposium, Princeton University.
  18. Kahana, M.J. (2005). The electrophysiology of human memory. Colloquium at, Princeton University, January.
  19. Kahana, M.J. (2005). electrophysiology of human memory. Institute for Neurological Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, April.
  20. Kahana, M.J. (2005). Theoretical correlations and measurement correlations: Relating recognition and recall in four distributed memory models. Lecture at the University of Pennsylvania’s Cognitive Tea, September.
  21. Liederman, J. (2005). Slide show presentation about the goals of CELEST. social hour designed to reach out to attendees at the annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, April.
  22. Miller, E.K. (2005). The prefrontal cortex: Concepts, categories, and cognitive control. CELEST Science of Learning seminar series, Boston University, April.
  23. Shinn-Cunningham, B.G. (2005). Influences of spatial cues on separating and understanding sound sources in divided and selective attention tasks. Lecture at the Office of Naval Research Workshop on Attention and Complex Processes, Washington DC, May.
  24. Shinn-Cunningham, B.G. (2005). ). Influences of spatial cues on grouping and understanding sound. Invited lecture, Forum Acusticum, Budapest, Hungary, 29 August–2 September.
  25. Shinn-Cunningham, B.G., Lin, I.-F., and Streeter, T. (2005). Trading directional accuracy for realism in a virtual auditory display. Invited lecture, 1st International Conference on Virtual Realty (part of Human Computer Interaction International), Las Vegas NV, July.
  26. Stern, C. (2005). An fMRI examination of how novel stimuli are maintained in working memory and encoded into long-term memory. CELEST Science of Learning seminar series, Boston University, November.
  27. van Vugt, M. (2005). Correlation between oscillatory activity and the summed-similarity parameter of the NEMO model, an exemplar-based model for recognition memory. Lecture at the Cognitive Neuroscience graduate symposium, Princeton University.
  28. Zilli, E. (2005). A model of prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in a spatial memory task. Invited lecture, Program in Neuroscience (PIN) seminar series, Boston University, April.