Center of Excellence for Learning in Education, Science and Technology A National Science Foundation Science of Learning Center

Non-Conference Presentations 2014

  1. Barbas, H (2014). Prefrontal pathways that control attention. Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton FL, March.
  2. Barbas, H (2014). Modulating prefrontal executive function. Hungarian Academy of Science, Tihany, Hungary, September.
  3. Bohland, J.W. (2014). From genes to neural systems: The transcriptome as an intermediate phenotype. Rafik B. Hariri Institute for Computing and Computational Science & Engineering seminar, Boston University, March.
  4. Bohland, J.W. (2014). Encoding of speech sequences during repetition tasks: neural correlates and effects of delayed feedback. Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences colloquium series, Boston University, April.
  5. Galbraith, B. (2014). A brain-machine interface for assistive robotic control. CN810 invited lecture, Boston University, March.
  6. Gardner, T (2014). High density recording from brain and nerves: Challenges and applications of stable interfaces. Boston University, Center for Systems Neuroscience, September.
  7. Jia, N. (2014). BCI project summary 06.2013–06.2014, Neural Prothesis Lab meeting, June.
  8. Jia, N. (2014). Decoding motor intentions online: Towards an eye movement brain-machine interface. Speech Lab meeting, August.
  9. Keller, A. and Sekuler, R. (2014). Undergraduate Science Fair, Brandeis University, April.
  10. Lim, Y. (2014). Transformation of temporal sequences to spatial patterns in songbird auditory system. GPN Student Seminar, Boston University.
  11. Lim, Y. (2014). ). Seeing sound: A new way to illustrate auditory objects and their neural correlates”. Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
  12. Markowitz, J. and Gardner, T.J. (2014). Network mechanisms of neural sequence generation in the songbird. Temporal Aspects of Neuronal Coding group meeting, Boston MA.
  13. Markowitz, J. and Gardner, T.J. (2014). Spatial organization of synchronous cell assemblies in HVC. Cognitive Rhythms Collaborative annual retreat, Boston MA.
  14. Markowitz, J. and Gardner, T.J. (2014). Spatial organization of synchronous cell assemblies in HVC. Graduate Program in Neuroscience (GPN) student seminar series, Boston University.
  15. Michalka, S. (2014). Dynamic recruitment of human frontal lobe networks for temporal and spatial processing. Henry I. Russek Student Achievement Day, Boston University, May.
  16. Shinn-Cunningham, B (2014). Hidden hearing loss in unsuspecting listeners and other sources of individual differences in communication ability. Brandeis University, Department of Psychology, September.
  17. Shinn-Cunningham, B (2014). From hidden hearing loss to cognitive control: Understanding individual differences affecting everyday communication. Boston University, Center for Systems Neuroscience, October.
  18. Somers, D.C. (2014). Human fronto-parietal attention networks for space, time, memory and perception. Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary / Schepens Eye Research Institute, Boston MA, March.
  19. Somers, D.C. (2014). Human fronto-parietal attention networks for space, time, and perception. Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences, Brown University, Providence RI, April.
  20. Torene, S., Brincat, S.L., Panko, M., Jia, N., Salazar-Gomez, A.F., Saligrama, V., Miller E,K., and Guenther, F.H. (2014). Adaptive decoding of eye movements with a simple recurrent artificial neural network. Henry I. Russek Student Achievement Day, Boston University, May.
  21. Versace, M. (2014). Neuromorphic solutions for autonomous land and aerial vehicles. Invited talk, NASA Langley, February.
  22. Versace, M. (2014). Hello Tomorrow Challenge. Invited talk, Paris, France, April.
  23. Versace, M. (2014). TEDx Fulbright. Invited talk, Washington DC, April.
  24. Versace, M. (2014). Neuromorphic solutions for autonomous land and aerial vehicles. Invited talk, NASA Ames, May.
  25. Versace, M. (2014). Neuromorphic solutions for autonomous land and aerial vehicles. Invited talk, Association of the United States Army, Washington DC, October.
  26. Versace, M. (2014). Invited Panelist at “Brains for Robots” session. at RoboBusiness 2014, Boston MA, October.
  27. Wolfe, J.M (2014). Ottawa University, Ottawa, Canada, April.
  28. Wolfe, J.M (2014). Free University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, May.
  29. Wolfe, J.M (2014). Amazon, Seattle WA, June.
  30. Wolfe, J.M. (2014). Kaiserslautern, Germany, March.
  31. Wolfe, J.M. (2014). National Central University, Jhongli City, Taiwan, June.
  32. Wolfe, J.M. (2014). University of Louisville, Louisville KY, September.
  33. Yazdanbakhsh, A. (2014). Figure-ground segregation and motion processing in the visual brain. Psychology Department, Northeastern University, Boston MA, January.
  34. Yazdanbakhsh, A. (2014). A biological multiscale sampling: Figure-ground segregation and motion processing in the visual brain. Center for Complex Systems, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton FL, April.
  35. Yazdanbakhsh, A. (2014). Multiscale sampling: Figure-ground segregation and motion processing across brain visual areas. Human Brain Imaging, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston MA, May.
  36. Yazdanbakhsh, A. (2014). Neural and computational models of vision: Fundamental problems of vision. Psychology Department, Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia, May.
  37. Yazdanbakhsh, A. (2014). Neural models and their implementation in early vision. Psychology Department, Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia, May.
  38. Yazdanbakhsh, A. (2014). Biologically-inspired flow field computation for sensing and control of ground vehicles. Computational Neuroscience and Vision Systems annual meeting, Arlington VA, June.
  39. Yazdanbakhsh, A. (2014). Reference frames in depth and in 2-dimensional visual space, and their effects on perceived target motion and eye movements. 2014-2015 Research Lecture Series, New England College of Optometry, September.